Protesters Surround Police Station in Minneapolis Suburb

The police declared the gathering unlawful and fired gas canisters toward demonstrators, some of whom threw water bottles. Our reporters are on the scene.,

LiveUpdated April 12, 2021, 11:41 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 11:41 p.m. ET

The police killing in a Minneapolis suburb has increased the tension around the trial of Derek Chauvin. Hundreds of people gathered on Monday night past the region’s 7 p.m. curfew.

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Protesters gathered outside the Police Department in Brooklyn Center, Minn., for a second night, in violation of the city’s curfew. Officers fired tear gas to disperse the crowd.CreditCredit…Joshua Rashaad McFadden for The New York Times
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April 12, 2021, 11:02 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 11:02 p.m. ET
Officer Kim Potter in 2007.
Officer Kim Potter in 2007.Credit…Bruce Bisping/Star Tribune, via Getty Images

Minnesota officials on Monday identified the police officer who shot Daunte Wright as Kim Potter, a 26-year veteran of the Brooklyn Center Police Department, and said she had been placed on administrative leave.

The state’s Bureau of Criminal Apprehension said in a brief statement that Officer Potter had been placed on “standard administrative leave.” The statement did not elaborate, citing an active investigation.

The Star Tribune newspaper reported on Monday that Officer Potter, 48, had been licensed as a police officer in Minnesota in 1995. It said that her duties over the course of her tenure had included serving on the department’s negotiation team.

Officer Potter could not be reached for comment.

She had been among the first to arrive at the scene after Kobe Edgar Dimock-Heisler, 21, was fatally shot in Brooklyn Center two years ago. An investigative report from the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office stated that she told two officers involved in the shooting to exit the residence, get into separate squad cars, turn off their body cameras and not talk to each other.

The Hennepin County report said the officers were found to be “justified in resorting to deadly force” during the confrontation with Mr. Dimock-Heisler. The report, released last year, identified Officer Potter as the president of the local police union.

On Monday, the Brooklyn Center police chief, Tim Gannon, told reporters that he believed that Officer Potter “had the intention” to deploy her Taser against Mr. Wright during a traffic stop on Sunday, “but instead shot Mr. Wright with a single bullet.”

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April 12, 2021, 10:42 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 10:42 p.m. ET
Officers built barricades surrounding the police station in Brooklyn Center, Minn.
Officers built barricades surrounding the police station in Brooklyn Center, Minn.Credit…Joshua Rashaad McFadden for The New York Times

The police in Brooklyn Center, Minn., declared a gathering of hundreds of protesters unlawful after a 7 p.m. curfew on Monday night, firing gas canisters toward demonstrators outside the police station who were demanding justice after the fatal shooting of Daunte Wright.

Some of the protesters were seen throwing water bottles toward officers, who stood in helmets on one side of the concrete barricades topped with a metal fence. They chanted “Hands up, don’t shoot” and “Black lives matter,” and shot fireworks into the air.

White smoke from the police projectiles streamed across the grass and street in front of the building, with some protesters regrouping behind umbrellas. Two armored law enforcement vehicles were rolled out.

In a television interview on Monday night, Mayor Mike Elliott of Brooklyn Center urged protesters to leave immediately and ensured residents that “ultimately we will get back to normal.” Speaking with CNN, Mayor Elliott said: “I’m asking everybody to go home. We need to keep the peace in our city.”

“We need to make sure that there is a tomorrow that people can gather peacefully as well and continue to express their grief,” he added. As the mayor spoke, images of city police officers in riot gear appeared on the screen.

It was a much quieter night at George Floyd Square in Minneapolis, near the convenience store where Mr. Floyd was killed in police custody in May. Near a police station that was burned during protests last year, workers were putting up plywood to protect the windows of a bike shop.

Matt Furber contributed reporting.

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April 12, 2021, 8:47 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 8:47 p.m. ET
Chief Tim Gannon of the Brooklyn Center Police Department referred to the killing of Daunte Wright as an “accidental discharge.”Credit…Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

While not common, instances of police officers accidentally firing a pistol when they meant to draw their Tasers, as the police in a Minneapolis suburb said happened on Sunday when an officer shot and killed Daunte Wright, are not entirely unusual, either.

In 2018, a rookie Kansas police officer mistakenly shot a man who was fighting with a fellow officer. In 2019, a police officer in Pennsylvania shouted “Taser!” before shooting an unarmed man in the torso. And in 2015, a former Oklahoma reserve deputy killed an unarmed man when he accidentally grabbed his handgun.

Ed Obayashi, a California-based expert on the use of force by law enforcement, said that with appropriate training, it should be difficult for officers to confuse a gun with a Taser. “But unfortunately it does happen — this is not the first time and it won’t be the last,” he said, referring to the fatal shooting of Mr. Wright.

In a 2012 article published in the law journal Americans for Effective Law Enforcement, Capt. Greg Meyer, a retired Los Angeles Police Academy instructor, documented nine similar instances between 2001 and 2009.

One of the most famous cases happened in 2009 in Oakland, Calif., when a white Bay Area transit officer shot and killed a Black man on New Year’s Day. The man, Oscar Grant III, was unarmed and lying facedown when the officer shot him. The officer was acquitted on charges of second-degree murder and voluntary manslaughter but was convicted of involuntary manslaughter and served 11 months in prison.

Scott A. DeFoe, a retired sergeant with the Los Angeles Police Department, said most police departments require officers to wear their Taser on their nondominant side, to prevent the officer from confusing it with their pistol. Tasers are often also marked with bright colors to distinguish them from pistols, and the grips are typically different from those of firearms.

“If you train enough, you should be able to tell,” he said.

In most cases, Deputy Obayashi said, the confusion occurs when officers carry both weapons on the same side of their body, or holster their stun guns on the opposite side of their body in such a way that it is easier for them to reach across with a dominant hand and cross-draw without deliberating.

In six of the nine cases from the 2012 article, including the shooting in Oakland, the officers carried both weapons on the same, “strong-hand” side of their bodies.

In several cases, the officers did not serve much jail time, or any. In the Pennsylvania case, for example, the district attorney said the officer violated a policy requiring officers to wear their Taser on the opposite side of their firearm. Still, he said the officer “did not possess the criminal mental state required to be guilty of a crime under state law.”

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April 12, 2021, 8:21 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 8:21 p.m. ET
A standoff between protesters and the police in Brooklyn Center, Minn., on Sunday night.
A standoff between protesters and the police in Brooklyn Center, Minn., on Sunday night.Credit…Aaron Nesheim for The New York Times

About 30 minutes after a curfew went into effect on Monday evening in Brooklyn Center, a Minneapolis suburb where a police officer shot and killed 20-year-old Daunte Wright, hundreds of protesters gathered in a steady rain outside the Police Department, chanting “Killer cop” as officers in riot gear stood guard behind newly erected fencing.

The protesters, who vastly outnumbered the officers standing outside, signaled no intention of leaving. Several times, a handful of protesters threw various items toward the officers, including rocks. At one point, several in the crowd, using megaphones, encouraged everyone to remain peaceful.

Many of the officers were armed with plastic ties, possibly anticipating arrests.

Across the region, curfews went into effect on Monday evening in response to civil disturbances on Sunday night after the fatal shooting of Mr. Wright.

Mayor Jacob Frey of Minneapolis and Mayor Melvin Carter of St. Paul declared a state of emergency and announced a curfew from 7 p.m. Monday to 6 a.m. Tuesday “due to civil unrest.” Gov. Tim Walz of Minnesota ordered the same curfew for Hennepin, Ramsey and Anoka Counties.

The curfew was imposed “in all public places” within the cities.

“All persons must not travel on any public street or in any public place,” the emergency order stated.

The order prohibited traveling by foot, bicycle, skateboard, scooter, vehicle or public transit. The order also affects the hours of the Minneapolis Skyway System, the pedestrian footbridges that connect various buildings, which the authorities said would close during the hours of the curfew.

Law enforcement, fire and medical personnel and members of the news media are exempt, as are people “traveling directly to and from work, seeking emergency care, fleeing dangerous circumstances, or experiencing homelessness,” according to the order.

A violation of the rule is considered a misdemeanor offense punishable with a fine not to exceed $1,000, “or imprisonment for not more than 90 days.”

Just before the curfew went into effect, Jamir Watson, 25, and his colleague Kyle Remackel, 22, stood outside in Brooklyn Center, each armed with an AR-15-style weapon.

“I’m here for the same reason Jamir is,” Mr. Remackel said, referring to looting that took place on Sunday night. “This is our community.”

Mr. Remackel said that his weapon was not loaded but that he hoped his presence would deter anyone who might break into a business. The men would probably be out late, they said, and would possibly violate curfew.

“It sucks watching my city burn for a second time in under a year,” Mr. Remackel said.

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April 12, 2021, 7:04 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 7:04 p.m. ET
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Curfews Are Imposed After Daunte Wright Shooting

Gov. Tim Walz of Minnesota and other officials pleaded for peace in the Twin Cities amid unrest in response to the fatal shooting of Mr. Wright, a Black man, during a traffic stop.

“For those who choose to go out and, as Mayor Carter said, to exploit these tragedies for destruction or personal gain, you can rest assured that the largest police presence in Minnesota history and coordination will be prepared. You will be arrested, you will be charged and there will be consequences for those actions. It’s not debatable. You’re not making the case. You’re hurting the case. You’re undermining the grief. And you hear it from families time and time again. Don’t you dare step into our space where we’re trying to enact change to our system.” “We cannot retraumatize our communities that have been hurt so much. And so for those individuals who may think that they are going to go into our communities and cause harm, to destroy property, to commit crimes, you will be held accountable.” “We must see peace tonight. And as of this afternoon, I have declared a state of emergency in the city of Minneapolis. And we are following that up with a curfew that will begin at 7:00 p.m. tonight, will go until 6:00 a.m. tomorrow morning.” “You cannot honor the memory of George Floyd, you cannot honor the memory of Daunte Wright, by wreaking havoc in the communities and the neighborhoods that they called home.”

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Gov. Tim Walz of Minnesota and other officials pleaded for peace in the Twin Cities amid unrest in response to the fatal shooting of Mr. Wright, a Black man, during a traffic stop.CreditCredit…Aaron Nesheim for The New York Times

Officials in the Minneapolis area are preparing for protests on Monday night in response to a fatal police shooting of a 20-year-old Black man that infuriated residents already on edge during the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, a former police officer.

The man, Daunte Wright, was shot on Sunday during a traffic stop in the suburb of Brooklyn Center. Hundreds of people gathered there to protest, and further demonstrations are expected on Monday in the Twin Cities — where professional sporting events were canceled — as well as New York and Portland, Ore.

Mayor Jacob Frey of Minneapolis and Mayor Melvin Carter of St. Paul declared a state of emergency and announced a curfew from 7 p.m. Monday to 6 a.m. Tuesday “due to civil unrest.” Gov. Tim Walz of Minnesota ordered the same curfew for Hennepin, Ramsey and Anoka Counties. And Mayor Mike Elliott of Brooklyn Center announced that the City Council had passed a motion “to give command authority over our Police Department to my office.”

On Sunday night, vigils and protests in the Minneapolis area sent hundreds of people into the streets, where they clashed with police officers into Monday morning. Hours later, President Biden called for “peace and calm” in Minnesota over the death of Mr. Wright and told reporters at the White House that a “full-blown investigation” was needed into the shooting.

Some protests last year after the death of George Floyd, a Black man whom Mr. Chauvin is accused of killing, resulted in vandalism and destruction; protesters burned down a police station in Minneapolis that officers had abandoned.

The rallies planned for Monday night include one promoted as “Justice for Daunte Wright,” at Grand Army Plaza in New York; a march and protest “in solidarity with Minneapolis” at Monument Park in Fort Lee, N.J.; and demonstrations in Portland, where protests continued for months last year.

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April 12, 2021, 7:03 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 7:03 p.m. ET

The New York Times

People gathered near the Hennepin County Courthouse and George Floyd Square near Cup Foods on Day 11 of the Derek Chauvin trial in Minneapolis.

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April 12, 2021, 5:39 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 5:39 p.m. ET
The phrase “Justice for Daunte Wright” was painted on the pavement near a memorial to George Floyd at Cup Foods in Minneapolis. Credit…Joshua Rashaad McFadden for The New York Times

The third week of the Derek Chauvin trial began just hours after a crowd of protesters gathered outside Minneapolis and clashed with police officers, in protest of a fatal police shooting on Sunday.

Eric J. Nelson, the defense lawyer for Mr. Chauvin, the former police officer who is accused of murder in the death of George Floyd, argued that the shooting and subsequent protests might make the jurors more likely to issue a guilty verdict, fearing that not doing so could set off a rash of civil unrest. The judge denied a request by Mr. Nelson to sequester the jury and to re-interview each juror about the shooting and the protests.

Closing arguments in the trial of Mr. Chauvin are expected to come at the beginning of next week. On Monday, jurors heard from Mr. Floyd’s brother as well as a cardiologist — one of several medical witnesses called by prosecutors — who said he saw no evidence that Mr. Floyd died from a drug overdose or a heart attack. Here are the takeaways from Day 11.

  • The day began with the backdrop of protests that kicked off on Sunday night in Brooklyn Center, a Minneapolis suburb about 10 miles north of the courthouse. Chief Tim Gannon of the Brooklyn Center Police Department said that an officer had shot Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old Black man, after pulling him over for a traffic violation. After the car was pulled over, the officer found that the driver had a warrant for his arrest. As the police tried to arrest him, Mr. Wright stepped back into his car, and the officer shot him. Protesters gathered on Sunday night outside the Brooklyn Center Police Department. Some of the demonstrators threw objects at police officers, who responded by firing chemical agents and rubber bullets. On Monday, Chief Gannon said the officer meant to grab her Taser, but she accidentally grabbed her pistol and shot Mr. Wright.

  • Philonise Floyd, George Floyd’s brother, gave tearful testimony about Mr. Floyd as a brother and a son. He talked about how they played video games together when they were children. “I finally beat him in a game, and I was just so happy,” he said, giving jurors some glimpse into George Floyd’s personality and family life. “Spark of life” testimonies, like that of Philonise Floyd’s, are generally not allowed, but Minnesota courts allow them as a way to present a fuller picture of victims as human beings — personalities and all. While looking at a photo of George Floyd as a toddler, sleeping while his mother cradled him and smiled, Philonise Floyd began to cry. Their mother died in 2018, and George Floyd was deeply affected, his brother said. “When we went to the funeral, George just sat there at the casket over and over again,” he said. “He would just say, ‘Mom, Mom’ over and over again.” Philonise Floyd said his brother was a talented athlete. When George Floyd was young, he would mark his height on the wall, always wanting to be taller to have an edge in sports. “He always wanted to be the best,” his brother said.

  • Dr. Jonathan Rich, a cardiologist called to the witness stand by prosecutors, said that Mr. Floyd’s death was “absolutely preventable” and that officers should have immediately begun chest compressions once they failed to find a pulse. Dr. Rich is one of several medical expert witnesses who have testified that Mr. Floyd died as a result of his interaction with police officers, not from a drug overdose or a heart attack, as the defense has suggested. Dr. Rich said Mr. Floyd died from “cardio pulmonary arrest” caused by low oxygen levels induced by the police restraint. “He was trying to get enough oxygen and because of the position that he was subjected to, the heart thus did not have enough oxygen,” he said. Mr. Chauvin had used his knee to hold Mr. Floyd handcuffed and facedown on the street for nine and a half minutes. Dr. Rich said he believed that had Mr. Floyd not been restrained in that way, he would have survived.

  • Seth Stoughton, a law professor and expert on the use of force, also testified and is expected to be the prosecution’s final witness. Mr. Stoughton said officers severely mishandled the arrest of Mr. Floyd on nearly every level. The prone position where Mr. Floyd was held for nine and a half minutes is meant to be a temporary position, he said, typically used for applying handcuffs on a suspect. In addition, he said the dangers of the prone position — that it can make it more difficult for people to breathe, particularly when there is extra weight on their back or neck — had been well known in policing for decades.

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April 12, 2021, 5:34 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 5:34 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

After testimony concludes, the judge tells jurors that the defense case will start tomorrow and likely be finished this week, “possibly with Friday off.” Closing arguments will start on Monday, he says, before he adjourns for the day.

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April 12, 2021, 5:15 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 5:15 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

Wow, the defense lawyer just invoked a phrase that is normally used to describe police actions that shock the conscience and illustrate the impunity of law enforcement — “lawful but awful” — as a defense of his client. “Just because it’s not very pretty does not mean that it’s not lawful,” the lawyer, Eric Nelson, added.

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April 12, 2021, 5:04 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 5:04 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

Eric Nelson, Derek Chauvin’s lawyer, is trying to back the expert witness, Seth Stoughton, into a corner on his insistence that a reasonable police officer would have had no reason to put George Floyd, who was already handcuffed, in the prone position, as Chauvin did. “Reasonable minds can disagree, agreed?” Nelson asks. To which Stoughton replies, “On this particular point? No.”

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April 12, 2021, 5:04 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 5:04 p.m. ET
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Expert on Use of Force Testifies in Chauvin Trial

Seth Stoughton, a law professor and former police officer, told jurors on Monday that “no reasonable officer” should have acted the way Derek Chauvin did while arresting George Floyd.

“Do you have an opinion to a degree of reasonable professional certainty as to whether defendant’s use of force, whereby he restrained Mr. Floyd in that prone position for 9 minutes and 29 seconds on May 25, 2020, was reasonable as viewed by a reasonable police officer on the scene?” “Yes.” “And what is that opinion?” “No reasonable officer would have believed that that was an appropriate, acceptable or reasonable use of force. The idea is an officer cannot use more force than the situation justifies. That is, the foreseeable effects of the officer’s use of force can’t be disproportionate to the threat presented by the individual’s actions. Looking at the threat analysis here, it’s clear from the number of officers and Mr. Floyd’s position, the fact that he’s handcuffed and has been searched, he doesn’t present a threat of harm. His actions don’t indicate that he presents any threat of escape. And as he’s, as he’s saying, Thank you, for being taken out of the back seat of the car, it would certainly suggest that the point of conflict that provoked his resistance in the first place is over, suggests a lack of intention. Given the, given the range of other alternatives available to the officers, it’s just not appropriate to prone someone who is at that point cooperative.” “Finally, do you have a degree, I’m sorry, an opinion to a degree of reasonable professional certainty as to whether the defendant appropriately rendered medical aid to Mr. George Floyd on May 25, 2020, in accordance with generally accepted police practices?” “I do, yes.” “And what is that opinion?” “The failure to render aid to Mr. Floyd, both by taking him out of the prone position and by rendering aid as his increasing medical distress became obvious, was unreasonable and contrary to generally accepted police practices.”

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Seth Stoughton, a law professor and former police officer, told jurors on Monday that “no reasonable officer” should have acted the way Derek Chauvin did while arresting George Floyd.CreditCredit…Still image, via Court TV

An expert on the use of force by police officers testified on Monday in the trial of former officer Derek Chauvin that “no reasonable officer” would have acted the way Mr. Chauvin did while arresting George Floyd, who did not appear to be aggressive or even pose a threat to officers.

Seth Stoughton, a law professor and former police officer, spent more than 100 hours reviewing the case against Mr. Chauvin. Testifying for the prosecution, he said he didn’t believe the videos of Mr. Floyd’s death showed him to to be a threat, echoing what the other experts in the trial have said so far.

Mr. Floyd does not appear to have the intention to assault or attack the officers,” he said. “No reasonable officer would have believed that that was an appropriate, acceptable or reasonable use of force.”

Mr. Stoughton walked the jury through many of the decisions the police made as videos of the arrest played from different angles. Mr. Chauvin’s defense attorney, Eric J. Nelson, challenged Mr. Stoughton’s account during cross-examination, arguing that the evidence showed the situation kept escalating and the officers were in danger.

By the time Mr. Floyd was on the ground, the “point of conflict” had been resolved, Mr. Stoughton testified. Mr. Floyd was cuffed, didn’t present a threat of harm, and had just thanked officers for taking him out of the squad car because he felt claustrophobic, Mr. Stoughton said. Once someone made a comment, which can be heard on the video, that Mr. Floyd had no pulse, it was clear that Mr. Floyd posed no threat.

“Somebody who does not have a pulse does not present a threat in any way,” Mr. Stoughton said.

Mr. Stoughton also said that drug use is not automatically a reason to use force during an arrest.

“Officers can’t use force on someone just because they are on drugs,” he said. “No reasonable officer would have believed that was an acceptable, appropriate and reasonable use of force.”

Mr. Stoughton disagreed with Mr. Nelson’s argument that bystanders, many of whom filmed the arrest, posed a threat to the officers. Had the officers felt threatened, they would not have yelled comments at the bystanders, Mr. Stoughton said.

The judge denied a motion earlier in the day by Mr. Chauvin’s defense lawyer, Eric J. Nelson, to block Mr. Stoughton’s testimony. Mr. Nelson had argued Mr. Stoughton’s testimony would be excessive given all the experts who testified on the topic last week. The judge did limit some of Mr. Stoughton’s testimony, saying it was “cumulative” and was in support of what other experts had already said.

Mr. Stoughton was a police officer with the Tallahassee Police Department for five years and served as an investigator in the inspector general’s office of the Florida Department of Education for three years, according to his biography on the University of South Carolina website.

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April 12, 2021, 4:51 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 4:51 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

Eric Nelson, Derek Chauvin’s lawyer, is now cross-examining the prosecution’s national use-of-force expert. But with these contorted questions, I’m confused — and it seems that the expert, Seth Stoughton, is as well — about what the defense is asking. I think Nelson is trying to argue that Chauvin had reason to believe going in that the situation with George Floyd could be dangerous.

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April 12, 2021, 4:54 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 4:54 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

Nelson is suggesting that Chauvin could use things like his previous experience and the number of officers already on the scene to determine his course of action. Stoughton is only partly buying it.

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April 12, 2021, 4:39 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 4:39 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

The whole point of Seth Stoughton‘s lengthy testimony for the prosecution was to explain what a reasonable police officer would have thought and done in Derek Chauvin’s position. His answer: “No reasonable officer would have believed that that was an appropriate, acceptable or reasonable use of force.”

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April 12, 2021, 4:28 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 4:28 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

Court is back in session with Seth Stoughton, a use-of-force expert, providing a frame-by-frame analysis of the police officers’ actions during George Floyd’s arrest. He says it took more than three and a half minutes before bystanders started to criticize the officers’ use of force on Floyd, countering defense arguments that the crowd interfered with their decision-making.

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April 12, 2021, 4:31 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 4:31 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

Stoughton says that if the officers had actually viewed the bystanders as a threat, they would not have made provocative comments to them like, “This is why you don’t do drugs.”

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April 12, 2021, 4:02 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 4:02 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

The court is taking a break. When the trial resumes, Seth Stoughton, a nationally recognized use-of-force expert, will continue to testify. He has done a play-by-play analysis of the officers’ actions, as seen on the bystander video of George Floyd’s arrest, and is walking the jury through his timeline.

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April 12, 2021, 3:53 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 3:53 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

Seth Stoughton, the use-of-force expert, is saying a lot of things that other witnesses have said, including that officers are not supposed to put weight on people’s necks. A prosecutor, Steve Schleicher, said this morning that Stoughton’s role was to help counteract “the Goldilocks syndrome” — a concern that the jury might not like one expert witness or another for random reasons.

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April 12, 2021, 4:02 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 4:02 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

Stoughton testifies that he has parsed through all of the dialogue among the police officers during George Floyd’s arrest. When one of them says that he cannot find Floyd’s pulse, Chauvin replies, “huh,” Stoughton says. He adds: “Somebody who does not have a pulse does not present a threat in any way.”

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April 12, 2021, 3:37 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 3:37 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

Seth Stoughton, a nationally recognized policing expert, is explaining that the officers did not need to put George Floyd face down while restraining him: He was already cuffed, did not present a threat of harm or escape, and he had just thanked them for taking him out of their squad car after complaining of claustrophobia, indicating that the “point of conflict” had been resolved.

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April 12, 2021, 3:41 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 3:41 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

It’s worth remembering that this expert is himself a former police officer, and he’s expressing a view that much of law enforcement echoed at the time of Floyd’s death: that a reasonable, trained police officer would not have done what Derek Chauvin did.

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April 12, 2021, 3:27 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 3:27 p.m. ET
Employees of the Council on American-Islamic Relations in Minneapolis watching body camera footage Monday showing a Brooklyn Center police officer shooting 20-year-old Daunte Wright during a traffic stop Sunday.
Employees of the Council on American-Islamic Relations in Minneapolis watching body camera footage Monday showing a Brooklyn Center police officer shooting 20-year-old Daunte Wright during a traffic stop Sunday.Credit…Craig Lassig/EPA, via Shutterstock

The center of the nation’s yearlong discussion about racial justice and policing seemed to shift 10 miles to the north of the courthouse in Minneapolis on Monday. The death of Daunte Wright after an officer shot him in a suburb of the city on Sunday grabbed the nation’s attention just as the trial of Derek Chauvin in the murder of George Floyd entered its 11th day.

Protesters in Brooklyn Center faced off with police all night after Mr. Wright was shot on Sunday, and into Monday morning. The police used chemical agents to disperse crowds who they said attacked some officers after a curfew was established. The scenes were reminiscent of the weeks of protest across the United States after Mr. Floyd died on May 25 in police custody in Minneapolis. And like the video of Mr. Floyd’s arrest, which has been replayed millions of times, there is footage of Mr. Wright, 20, being shot.

After that video was released on Monday, the mayors of St. Paul and Minneapolis announced a curfew that starts at 7 p.m. and ends at 6 a.m. for the two cities. Gov. Tim Walz has ordered the same curfew for all of Hennepin, Ramsey and Anoka counties.

Just hours after the police cleared protesters in Brooklyn Center, the shooting of Mr. Wright became part of the trial of Mr. Chauvin, who is charged in the murder of Mr. Floyd. Mr. Chauvin’s defense attorney, Eric J. Nelson, argued that jurors needed to be sequestered after the unrest on Sunday because it would be harder for them to be impartial as events involving a police officer shooting unfolded so close by. Judge Peter Cahill denied that request.

A news conference by Mike Elliot, the mayor of Brooklyn Center, scheduled for early afternoon was delayed as President Biden called to offer any necessary resources. Mr. Elliot and the police chief, Tim Gannon, released footage of the body camera worn by the officer who shot Mr. Wright.

It was quick and disturbing, with the officer yelling “Taser” and then “Holy shit. I just shot him.” Mr. Gannon said the shooting was an accident, and the officer was placed on administrative leave.

“This couldn’t have happened at a worse time,” Mr. Elliot said. “This is happening at a moment when the whole world is watching. We are collectively devastated. Our entire community is full of grief.”

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April 12, 2021, 3:26 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 3:26 p.m. ET
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George Floyd’s brother, Philonise Floyd, testified on Monday in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, the former police officer charged in Mr. Floyd’s death, and spoke about who George Floyd was as a person and the memories they shared growing up.CreditCredit…Still image, via Court TV

In brief, but tearful testimony, Philonise Floyd spoke in loving terms about his oldest brother, George Floyd, on the 11th day of testimony in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin.

Mr. Floyd, 39, described how the family moved to Houston from North Carolina when he was younger.

The family lived in a low-income development in the Third Ward where Mr. Floyd and his siblings grew up.

“We stayed with each other all the time, me and George,” Mr. Floyd said, adding that they enjoyed playing video games as children.

As the big brother, George Floyd took care of his siblings and “was so much of a leader in the household,” his brother said.

“George used to make the best banana mayonnaise sandwiches,” Mr. Floyd said with a smile. He said that George Floyd “couldn’t cook — he couldn’t boil water,” but that he always made sure the siblings had a snack and had their clothes for school.

Philonise Floyd said his brother was also passionate about sports and excelled in football and basketball.

“He always wanted to be the best,” he said.

At one point in the testimony, the prosecutor presented a photo of George Floyd in his No. 5 team jersey, standing with his basketball team when he was a student at South Florida Community College.

“He loved playing basketball, and he loved teaching people the game of basketball,” Mr. Floyd recalled.

Asked about George Floyd’s relationship with their mother, Mr. Floyd described it as “one of a kind” and added “he was a big momma’s boy.”

Mr. Floyd became teary-eyed when he talked about their close relationship.

“He showed us how to treat our mom, how to respect our mom,” he said. “He loved her so dearly.”

He said he and George Floyd texted and called each other often.

“He was my big brother,” he said.

The loss of their mother in May 2018 was very painful for George Floyd, his brother said.

At the funeral, “he was just kissing her, just kissing her, and he didn’t want to leave the casket.”

Mr. Floyd said that was the last time he saw his brother alive.

There was no cross-examination.

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April 12, 2021, 3:17 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 3:17 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

I like hearing Seth Stoughton, a policing expert, explain the difference between a risk (someone changing a tire with a tire iron) and a threat (someone brandishing a tire iron) on the stand. I and every other criminal justice reporter in the country have already heard him explain it on the phone — he is a go-to guy for journalists on this issue.

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April 12, 2021, 2:59 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 2:59 p.m. ET

By Traci Carl

Philonise Floyd, George Floyd’s younger brother, testified on Monday that his brother was deeply affected by their mother’s death in 2018:

He loved her so dearly. And when George, he had found out that my mom was passed and — because she had to stay with us for hospice — and he was talking to her over the phone, but she perished before he even came down here. So that right there, it hurt him a lot. And when we went to the funeral, George just sat there at the casket over and over again. He would just say, “Mom, Mom, over and over again.” And I didn’t know what to tell him because I was in pain, too. We all were hurting, and he was just kissing her, just kissing. And he didn’t want to leave the casket. And everybody was like, “Come on, come on, it’s going to be OK.” But it was just difficult.

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April 12, 2021, 2:50 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 2:50 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

The defense sought to keep this witness, Seth Stoughton, a policing expert, off the stand as redundant, but the prosecution said that even after presenting multiple witnesses who said Derek Chauvin had violated Minneapolis Police Department policy while restraining George Floyd, they needed an expert witness to provide an academic, national point of view.

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April 12, 2021, 2:51 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 2:51 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

The prosecution said police policies do not necessarily reflect what’s reasonable or legal: “The defendant is not on trial for violating policies. He’s on trial for violating the law.”

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April 12, 2021, 2:47 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 2:47 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

We expect Seth Stoughton, the use-of-force expert who has just taken the stand, to be the prosecution’s final witness until after the defense presents its case.

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April 12, 2021, 2:46 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 2:46 p.m. ET
Seth Stoughton, a law professor and expert on the use of force, testified on Monday during the trial of the former officer Derek Chauvin, at Hennepin County District Court.
Seth Stoughton, a law professor and expert on the use of force, testified on Monday during the trial of the former officer Derek Chauvin, at Hennepin County District Court. Credit…Still image, via Court TV

An expert on police force who testified Monday in the trial of former officer Derek Chauvin said George Floyd did not appear to be aggressive or even pose a threat to officers.

Seth Stoughton, a law professor, was called by the prosecution and spent more than 100 hours reviewing the case against Mr. Chauvin. He said he didn’t believe the videos of Mr. Floyd’s death showed him to be aggressive.

The judge denied a motion this morning by Mr. Chauvin’s defense lawyer, Eric J. Nelson, to block Mr. Stoughton’s testimony. Mr. Nelson had argued Mr. Stoughton’s testimony would be excessive given all the experts who testified on the topic last week. The judge said he would limit the scope to avoid redundancy.

Mr. Stoughton was a police officer with the Tallahassee Police Department for five years and served as an investigator in the inspector general’s office of the Florida department of education for three years, according to his biography on the University of South Carolina website.

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April 12, 2021, 2:45 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 2:45 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

George Floyd called out for his mama as he died. His brother, Philonese Floyd, has just explained how close he was to her — how he stayed by her casket, giving her kisses, after she died in 2018. The defense opted not to cross-examine Floyd’s brother.

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April 12, 2021, 2:42 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 2:42 p.m. ET

By Becca Foley

A memorial in the lobby at the Chicago Avenue Fire Arts Center near George Floyd Square.
A memorial in the lobby at the Chicago Avenue Fire Arts Center near George Floyd Square.Credit…Aaron Nesheim for The New York Times

Normally, when jurors are weighing the guilt or innocence of a defendant, they will not hear much about the victim’s life. Most states view that kind of testimony irrelevant or prejudicial. Minnesota is different, thanks to a 1985 case where the victim was a police officer.

In that case, a man who had escaped from federal custody led Officer Bruce Russell on a high speed car chase. When the man, George Graham, finally skidded into a ditch, Officer Russell approached and was shot in the chest.

Officer Russell died almost immediately, but Mr. Graham escaped. He was caught hours later and was charged with first-degree murder and other crimes.

Officer Russell was 28 and was approaching his one-year anniversary on the force when he was killed. He was a husband and father.

In the opening statement of Mr. Graham’s trial, the prosecutor broke down in tears as he discussed emotional details of the victim’s personal life. He was so overcome that in the middle of his statement, he requested a recess to collect himself.

The defense objected to the addition of these personal details, saying the prosecution was invoking the sympathy of the jury.

The trial ruled that the prosecution could present the victim as a human being, as long as it did not become character evidence or invoke undue sympathy. The ruling stated that the testimony was allowed because “the victim was not just bones and sinews covered with flesh but was imbued with the spark of life” — and thus Minnesota’s spark-of-life doctrine was born.

Mr. Graham was sentenced to life in prison.

In the trial of Derek Chauvin, George Floyd’s brother, Philonise Floyd, is expected to be the main spark-of-life witness and will show pictures of him when he was younger and discuss his close relationship with his mother.

Part of the testimony of Mr. Floyd’s girlfriend, Courteney Ross, on April 1 also fell under the spark-of-life doctrine. Through tears, she described how they met at the Salvation Army, when she was visiting her son’s father and Mr. Floyd was working as a security guard there.

Ms. Ross said the two of them liked to explore the city, pray together or go out to eat. “It was an adventure, always,” she said.

She described Mr. Floyd’s close relationship with his mother, and how devastated he was when she died. “He didn’t have the same kind of bounce,” Ms. Ross said. “It’s so hard to lose a parent that you love like that.”

At a pretrial hearing, Matthew Frank, a prosecutor, explained the importance of the inclusion of spark-of-life witnesses: “This puts some, you know, personal nature back into the case for somebody who’s treated so impersonally, unfortunately, by the system.”

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April 12, 2021, 2:41 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 2:41 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

George Floyd’s brother is saying that they were always “hooping,” by which he means playing basketball. The defense has suggested that on the day he died, Floyd said he had been “hooping,” which the defense said was a reference to hiding drugs.

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April 12, 2021, 2:34 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 2:34 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

Philonese Floyd, George Floyd’s brother, now testifying in the trial, breaks down in tears when he is shown a childhood photograph of George and his smiling mother, who was known affectionately as “Miss Cissy.”

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April 12, 2021, 2:37 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 2:37 p.m. ET

Shaila Dewan

Reporting from Minneapolis

Floyd’s brother, who is on the stand to give jurors a sense of Floyd as a person, says he was an excellent athlete who measured his height against the wall of their home. “He wanted to be taller all the time because he loved sports, he always wanted to be the best.”

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April 12, 2021, 2:28 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 2:28 p.m. ET
Philonise Floyd, the brother of George Floyd, at the Hennepin County Government Center on Friday.
Philonise Floyd, the brother of George Floyd, at the Hennepin County Government Center on Friday.Credit…Brandon Bell/Getty Images

MINNEAPOLIS — Last summer, as American cities seethed with protest in the aftermath of another Black man dying at the hands of the police, the family of George Floyd gathered to mourn the loss of their “gentle giant,” as he was often described.

Mr. Floyd’s brother, Philonise Floyd, took the witness stand on Monday, on the 11th day of testimony for the prosecution in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, the former police officer charged in Mr. Floyd’s death, and spoke about the type of person his brother was, to humanize him for the jurors who are weighing the guilt or innocence of Mr. Chauvin.

“Mr. Floyd is entitled to have the jury realize he was a human being, he was loved, he had a family,” Judge Peter A. Cahill said during an oral argument in court on the issue.

Yet one description of Mr. Floyd that was heard again and again over the summer, at memorial services and in interviews with family members, was verboten: “gentle giant.”

Those two words, Judge Cahill said, would have allowed Mr. Chauvin’s defense lawyer, on cross-examination, to challenge that assertion by bringing in Mr. Floyd’s criminal past.

If someone did refer to Mr. Floyd as a “gentle giant” in court, Judge Cahill said, “I think then we’re getting into character evidence and that does open the door for the defense to cross-examine about his character for peacefulness.”

Such is the delicate balancing act required by a doctrine that is unique to Minnesota’s legal system: “spark of life” testimony, which holds no evidentiary value but is allowed on a limited basis to present a fuller picture to the jury about the life and character of the victim.

“Everything else,” Judge Cahill continued, “how he grew up, some pictures, that he was loved, that he was a wonderful father, brother, nephew — all that stuff I think is permissible.”

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April 12, 2021, 1:32 p.m. ETApril 12, 2021, 1:32 p.m. ET
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‘Accidental Discharge’: Officer Fatally Shoots Black Man in Minnesota

Officials from Brooklyn Center, Minn., a suburb outside of Minneapolis, held a news conference after an officer fired her gun on Sunday during a traffic stop, killing a Black man. Brooklyn Center is less than 10 miles away from the trial of Derek Chauvin.

“As I watched the video and listen to the officer’s commands, it’s my belief that the officer had the intention to deploy their Taser, but instead shot Mr. Wright with a single bullet. This appears to me from what I viewed and the officer’s reaction and distress immediately after, but this was an accidental discharge that resulted in the tragic death of Mr. Wright.” “Our hearts are aching right now. We are in pain right now. And we recognize that this couldn’t have happened at a worse time. We recognize that this is happening at a time when our community, when all of America, indeed, all of the world, is watching our community. That we are all collectively devastated, and we have been for over a year now by the killing of George Floyd and that we continue to be distressed as we go through the Derek Chauvin trial.”

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Officials from Brooklyn Center, Minn., a suburb outside of Minneapolis, held a news conference after an officer fired her gun on Sunday during a traffic stop, killing a Black man. Brooklyn Center is less than 10 miles away from the trial of Derek Chauvin.CreditCredit…Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

The police officer who shot a man during a traffic stop in a Minneapolis suburb on Sunday fired her weapon accidentally, Tim Gannon, the police chief, said on Monday. Mr. Gannon said the officer, who has been placed on leave, meant to reach for her Taser and instead grabbed her gun.

The officer yelled “Taser” as Daunte Wright, who had been stopped for a traffic violation, appeared to re-enter his vehicle, Mr. Gannon said at a news conference, alongside Mayor Mike Elliot of Brooklyn Center, a suburb about 10 miles from Minneapolis. The chief and Mr. Elliot said they understood protesters, who took to the streets on Sunday night, were angry, but they urged them to demonstrate peacefully.

“There is nothing I can say to lessen the pain” of Mr. Wright’s family, Mr. Gannon said before showing the video from the traffic stop. “This will be graphic and unedited. I felt the community needed to see what happened.”

Mr. Wright died after the police officer, whom Mr. Gannon described as a “very senior officer,” shot him during the traffic stop in the Minneapolis suburb on Sunday, sending hundreds of people into the streets where they clashed with police officers into Monday morning.

The protests in Brooklyn Center came hours before the 11th day of the trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer who has been charged with the murder of George Floyd, began in a courtroom less than 10 miles away. Mr. Floyd’s death in May prompted the biggest wave of protests against racial injustice in the country since the Civil Rights era.

Outside the Brooklyn Center Police Department on Sunday night, smoke billowed into the air as a line of police officers fired rubber bullets and chemical agents at protesters, some of whom lobbed rocks, bags of garbage and water bottles at the police. Mr. Elliott ordered a curfew until 6 a.m., and the local school superintendent said the district would shift to remote learning on Monday “out of an abundance of caution.”

Earlier, the judge in the trial, Peter A. Cahill, denied the defense’s request to sequester the jury. Mr. Chauvin’s lawyer, Eric J. Nelson, argued that the unrest in Brooklyn Center would make it harder for the jurors to be impartial. Mr. Nelson had argued during selection last month that jurors should be sequestered for the whole trial.

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